For the next 2 years I had 3 consecutive failures and was pretty humbled by that. It was a good lesson in humility for sure. I learned a lot from the failures, maybe even more than from the successes. The point I want to make is not to expect everything to work, but that's OK, as long as you keep getting back on the horse. And maybe more importantly is that when you are riding your success be sure to plan for the possibility it could fail by not risking all your money on the venture. If it does fail you'll want to have some funds to start the next venture.
You can also sign up for Patreon, which allows you to launch membership-only video channels through YouTube at a small fee per month for regular rewards. Just imagine how much a YouTube channel could generate if it has the 1,000 subscribers required by the YPP. Charge $1 for a new channel with new content, and you could be looking at a solid monthly revenue stream.
Ebay is a bellwether. It's been around since nearly the start of the online boom. But, like any other platform, success can seem fleeting if you don't know what you're doing. Selling items on eBay, professionally that is, can be an art form. Getting people interested in your auctions isn't always easy, especially when there's hefty competition and low demand for what you're selling.
First, you need to be willing to work more if you want to earn more. Everyone wants to magically earn more money by working less, but it doesn't work that way. Second, you need to be willing to try new things. You don't necessarily need to be creative. You just need to be willing to try to earn money in a different way than you currently are doing.
I was honestly looking for a little more from the article. If I make a video with 1 million views, and you have a video with 1,000 views, its possible that you made more money than I did… but not very likely. If you looked at a large sample of data, you could definitely find, ON AVERAGE, the amount of money made per view. If there is a relationship between number of views and number of engagements (which there is), then there must exist a relationship between views and money made.
Keep in mind though, you don’t need a website to do sponsored content since you can also get paid if you have a lot of social media followers. My wife has a pretty big Instagram following, and she gets all kinds of sponsorships. Not only does she get paid in cash, but we get a lot of free stuff, too. We’ve received free rugs, free lights, and free carpet cleaners. She only promotes things she loves though, so this strategy works really well for her.
Then once you’ve got your domain name and hosting sorted out, it’s time to pick a CMS, or Content Management System, that will let you update pages, build your blog and integrate with all the other services you need. It’s hard to go wrong with WordPress—the CMS powering close to a quarter of the internet. Keep in mind that eventually as you start growing traffic to your blog, you'll be wise to invest in a managed WordPress hosting plan from a company with great service like Kinsta, where all of the settings are custom-tailored and optimized to work particularly well with WordPress-powered websites.

I disagree, I believe that he (or she) meant that people that are 55 are generally involved with and enjoy very different things than a 25 year old would. Now I’m not trying to be ageist, but it is true, for example, and this is exaggerating a bit, would a 55 year old look up and watch a makeup tutorial on how to be a sexy cat on halloween, I don’t believe many would. Again, I don’t mean to be ageist, but that is just my opinion.


Now, I know what you’re thinking. Most of the software and apps you use on a regular basis are made by massive companies or established development studios. Well, yes. But many successful apps, particularly those in the Apple and Google stores, are created and marketed by individuals and small businesses. In fact, independent developers made $20 billion in the App Store in 2016 alone.
Even if it’s a mundane task like walking dogs, you could start the next (or only) full-service dog walking and grooming service in your town, where dog owners rave over your business and always refer you to others. You can hire other dog walkers as you grow, and turn your side hustle into a sustainable enterprise. You just have to do the work, and do it well.
If talking on the phone is not practical for you, you can still work a customer service job from home. Many of the same companies that hire call center agents, also hire chat agents. And in addition to these customer service chat jobs, there are other online chat jobs from home. These include answering questions, doing internet research, moderating in social media and more. 
As I stated earlier, I have this affiliate internet marketing e-course. I very highly recommend you sign up for it. It won’t make you an expert, but it will help get you off to the right start, including step by step video instructions for finding the best niche and even how to create your own website. In less than one week, you can be off and running.

Comply with laws regulating SPAM. Familiarize yourself with the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC’s) CAN-SPAM Act. This act specifies requirements for commercial emails, gives customers the option to opt out of receiving emails from you and imposes tough penalties for violations. It applies to all commercial email, including bulk email, individual commercial messages, business-to-business (B2B) commercial messages and emails sent to consumers.[23]


Research individual companies in your desired niche: If possible, it’s always better to become an affiliate directly with a company (if they have an internal affiliate program), as no one else will be dipping into your commission rate. This is the preferred route for most of the prominent affiliate marketers, including Pat Flynn. Unfortunately, it’s also the most work, as you’ll have to do the research yourself to see who offers programs (they’re usually listed in the website footer).
If you’ve got a way with words and expertise in a niche, there are plenty of sites that will pay for articles and content you write. Think of the sites you read regularly. What can you contribute to them that would be interesting? Research your niche and then look for ways to pitch articles. Many sites will simply have a submission or contact link in the footer. To get started, check out my full guide to becoming a freelance writer on the side and then submit your articles to places like Instash, Listverse, TopTenz, A List Apart, International Living, FundsforWriters, and Textbroker.
Affiliate marketing is often touted as a "get rich quick scheme" by shady sites offering pyramid schemes that promise quick cash for little effort. Make no mistake—successful affiliate marketers like Pat Flynn of Smart Passive Income put in a lot of effort toward building an audience and creating quality content that will bring in sustainable passive income. Expect to do a lot of legwork up front—but if you play your cards right, you can build a solid source of revenue over time.
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